Freedom of Speech

Phantom Band, 1981

Listening to the solo works of the various members of German legends, Can, you realize the band actually was, quite literally, the sum of its constituent parts. They were just amazing parts. Which is exactly why I love Freedom of Speech, by Phantom Band, because it plays exactly like an early-80s band led by Can's drummer ought to.

Though a drummer famous for devilish complexity, Jaki Liebezeit always played with sparse economy. As an album, Freedom of Speech is minimal in measures equal to his beats. Rhythms, cautiously conceal their craft in strident repetitions, while a keyboard or guitar fills are draped about, here or there, as filigree giving the illusion of song. It might have been a dour LP without vocalist Sheldon Ancel's humor, which never tips into novelty. More than once, I thought of John Lurie's Marvin Pontiac album, Greatest Hits (from 18 years later). Freedom of Speech represents a perfect showcase for the skill, restraint and playfulness that made Jaki Liebezeit's contributions to Can otherwise immeasurable.