One Thousand Years of Trouble

Age of Chance, 1987

Long before there was Kid Rock or Rage Against the Machine, their was Age of Chance from Leeds, pioneering rap-rock. I first heard them on the legendary NME C86 compilation, and sometime shortly thereafter, picked up 1000 Years of Trouble, as a cassette. [Quick aside: cassettes may be back in fashion with the ultra-hip, but let's give them one genuine advantage: used cassettes were cheap as shit, and that was kind of awesome to a kid on an allowance.] I can't say I've thought much about Age of Chance since I left for college, but a 30-year anniversary write-up on 1000 Years of Trouble over at the Quietus convinced me to go back and listen again.

With a little time and distance, I have to say Age of Chance aged well. There's something about 80s British rock and rap music. It must not have tasted so forbidden to them, as it did stateside. Maybe rap seemed as much an American innovation, as much as one bound up in race. To a white, suburban kid in America, most hip hop felt like trespassing, but a band like Age of Chance gave me an entrance. In retrospect, 1000 Years of Trouble is more convincing to me than, say, License to Ill. Age of Chance have some real vitriol to vent and enough clattering bombast to back it up. They even were even able to score remixes from hip hop legends like Afrika Bambaataa and the Bomb Squad, which ain't nothin'.